New Return Requested On Amazon For Order 502-2849265-1928845 – Phishing

Phishing Scam

New Return Requested on Amazon for order 502-2849265-1928845. pretending to come from Amazon.co.uk <annazon@amazonaws.co.uk> is one of the latest phish attempts to steal your Amazon Account

This one only wants your  Amazon log in details

Please read our How to protect yourselves page for simple, sensible advice on how to avoid being infected by this sort of socially engineered malware.

The original email looks like this It will NEVER be a genuine email from Amazon or any other company so don’t ever click the link in the email. If you do it will lead you to a website that looks at first glance like the genuine Amazon website but you can clearly see in the address bar, that it is fake. Some versions of this phish will ask you fill in the html ( webpage) form that comes attached to the email.

From:  Amazon.co.uk <annazon@amazonaws.co.uk>

Date:  Tue 06/12/2016 13:09

Subject: New Return Requested on Amazon for order 502-2849265-1928845.

Attachment:  0AC27757_1465095170.docm

Body content:

New Return Requested on Amazon for order 502-2849265-1928845. Please use the link to take action on this return request. http://orders.amazon.co.uk

The link leads to http://tolmasoft.ru/ViewListingAccount-dvk@[redacted].co.uk.html

If you open the attached html file you see a webpage looking like:

When you fill in your user name and password you get immediately redirected to the genuine Amazon.co.uk home page, where you think that you have  logged in properly.

All of these emails use Social engineering tricks to persuade you to open the attachments that come with the email. Whether it is a message saying “look at this picture of me I took last night” and it appears to come from a friend or is more targeted at somebody who regularly is likely to receive PDF attachments or Word .doc attachments or any other common file that you use every day. Or whether it is a straight forward attempt, like this one, to steal your personal, bank, credit card or email and social networking log in details. Be very careful when unzipping them and make sure you have “show known file extensions enabled“, And then look carefully at the unzipped file. If it says .EXE then it is a problem and should not be run or opened.